Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Moving America Forward

American leadership in the fight against global warming is crucial. America is the world’s largest economy, the second-largest emitter of global warming pollution, and the nation responsible for more of the human-caused carbon dioxide pollution in the atmosphere than any other. Without prompt action by the United States and others to reduce global warming pollution, catastrophic impacts – from coastal flooding to food system disruptions – could become unavoidable. 

Report | Environment America

Skating on Thin Ice

"When it comes to the future of winter sports, global warming has us skating on thin ice. There's still time to keep from sliding off the edge by going after the biggest sources of the carbon pollution fueling the problem." -- Julian Boggs, global warming program director, Environemnt America.

Report | Environment America

Shalefield Stories

Across the country, fracking is contaminating drinking water, making nearby families sick with air pollution, and turning forest acres into industrial zones. We believe it is vital for the public to hear directly from people living on the frontlines of fracking, and so Environment America Research & Policy Center is supporting the Shalefield Stories project—a booklet designed and published by local activists where people impacted by fracking tell their stories, in their own words.

Report | Environment America

Death by a Thousand Cuts

Our nation’s parks have been called “America’s best idea,” and represent the rugged and resilient spirit of our natural heritage. They offer us endless recreational opportunities, provide critical habitat for local wildlife, and protect the sources of fresh drinking water for communities all across the country. As a result, their popularity with the public is at an all-time high, and visitor numbers continue to rise.

Report | Environment America

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

Burning fossil fuels to generate electricity pollutes our air, contributes to global warming, and consumes vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. In contrast, wind energy produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water. 

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