Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Fighting Fracking: A Toolkit for Activists

Across the country, fracking is endangering our health, contaminating our drinking water, and worsening the climate crisis. From the chemicals used to the toxic wastewater produced to the methane emitted, every aspect of the fracking process is putting our families and our communities at risk.

Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

Dangerous and Close

Oil and gas companies are fracking near our communities, polluting our air and water, and risking the health of our children and other vulnerable populations. Fracking often is done very close to vulnerable people – infants, school children, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems – even though communities typically seek to keep industrial activities far away from facilities serving these populations, such as schools, hospitals, nursing homes and day care centers. 

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Fracking Failures

Oil and gas industry spokespeople routinely maintain that the risks of fracking can be minimized by best practices and appropriate state regulation. Not only is this false - fracking is harmful even when drillers follow all the rules - but, as this report shows, drillers regularly violate essential public health protections, undermining their own claims.

Report | Environment America

Shalefield Stories

Across the country, fracking is contaminating drinking water, making nearby families sick with air pollution, and turning forest acres into industrial zones. We believe it is vital for the public to hear directly from people living on the frontlines of fracking, and so Environment America Research & Policy Center is supporting the Shalefield Stories project—a booklet designed and published by local activists where people impacted by fracking tell their stories, in their own words.

Report | Environment America

Fracking by the Numbers

Over the past decade, the oil and gas industry has fused two technologies—hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling—in a highly polluting effort to unlock oil and gas in underground rock formations across the United States.

As fracking expands rapidly across the country, there are a growing number of documented cases of drinking water contamination and illness among nearby residents. Yet it has often been difficult for the public to grasp the scale and scope of these and other fracking threats. Fracking is already underway in 17 states, with more than 80,000 wells drilled or permitted since 2005. Moreover, the oil and gas industry is aggressively seeking to expand fracking to new states—from New York to California to North Carolina—and to areas that provide drinking water to millions of Americans.

This report seeks to quantify some of the key impacts of fracking to date—including the production of toxic wastewater, water use, chemicals use, air pollution, land damage and global warming emissions.

Report | Environment America

Who Pays the Cost of Fracking?

Fracking operations pose a staggering array of threats to our environment and health – contaminating drinking water, harming the health of nearby residents, marring forests and landscapes, and contributing to global warming. Many of these damages from drilling have significant “dollars and cents” costs. To the extent that this dirty drilling is allowed to
continue, policymakers must require, among other things, that the oil and gas industry provide up front financial assurance commensurate with the potential for damage.

Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

The Costs of Fracking

The Costs of Fracking report documents a wide range of dollars and cents costs imposed by dirty drilling. The report makes clear that fracking creates millions of dollars of health costs related to everything from air pollution to ruined roads to contaminated property.