Updates

We helped win the biggest step forward for clean water in a decade

Over half of the nation’s streams, which feed drinking water sources for one in three Americans, will regain federal protections under a final rule signed by the Obama administration. The measure restores Clean Water Act safeguards to small streams and headwaters that have been vulnerable to development and pollution for nearly 10 years. Environment America and allies gathered more than 800,000 comments and held more than half a million face-to-face conversations about the need to close the loophole in the Clean Water Act. Learn about our Clean Water for America campaign here. 

News Release | Environment America

Obama Administration Takes Important Step toward Protecting America’s Waterways

From the Chesapeake Bay to the Puget Sound to the many smaller waters in between, America’s waterways are today one step closer to protection under the Clean Water Act, as the Obama administration is now in the final stage of issuing guidelines to restore critical Clean Water Act protections to the nation’s waterways.

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Headline

4 out of 5 Americans affected by weather-related disasters since 2006, study finds

Since 2006 , federally declared weather-related disasters in the United States have affected counties housing 242 million people--or roughly four out of five Americans.

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News Release | Environment America

U.S. Senate Bill Attacks Children’s Health, Sides with Polluters

Today, Senator James Inhofe (R-OK) introduced a joint resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act, an effort to strike down the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Mercury and Air Toxics standard for power plants. The standard is the first-ever nationwide standard for mercury and air toxics pollution from power plants, and will cut toxic mercury pollution from power plants by 90 percent while saving 11,000 lives.

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Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

After a year that saw many parts of the country hit by scorching heat, devastating wildfires, severe storms and record flooding, a new Environment America report documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future. The report found that, already, 4 out of 5 Americans live in counties affected by federally declared weather-related disasters since 2006.

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News Release | Environment America

4 of 5 Americans Hit by Recent Weather Disasters; New Report Says Global Warming to Bring More Extreme Weather

After a year that saw many parts of the country hit by scorching heat, devastating wildfires, severe storms and record flooding, a new Environment America report documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future. The report found that, already, 4 out of 5 Americans live in counties affected by federally declared weather-related disasters since 2006. Last year’s Hurricane Irene, which resulted in the death of 45 people in the 13 states hit by the storm, and an estimated $7.3 billion in damage, is one of the extreme weather events highlighted in the report.

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